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ALERT - UV Per In Outburst

BRJ
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The UGSU-type star 0203+56A UV Per was noted last evening as undergoing one of its rare outbursts.

On 2012-06-24.1667UT the variable was seen at magnitude 13.3 when still very low in the northeastern sky. Unfortunately, coverage of this star seems to have been particularly poor recently, with no reported observations indicated in AAVSO records since mid April of this year. Thus, it is difficult to say how long the current outburst may have been in progress.

BRJ

UV Per
BRJ
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Based on Kevin Paxson's observation of UV Per this morning at June 25.45UT, resulting in a magnitude of 15.73 , it is clear that the current outburst of UV is ending. That the event was even detected at all this time around was extremely fortunate. It also seems probable, given the brevity of the outbursts UV often displays, that the date of actual maximum was likely just a day, or two, earlier than my initial observation on June 24.17UT.

BRJ

Seasonal issue
lmk
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Well John, I think its primarily that its poorly placed for observations in this season. Its too low in the N for me at my latitude, and others far north are in perpetual twilight, so its only visible in a narrow band of mid-northern latitudes, and not so easy even there.

Mike LMK

UV Per
BRJ
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Indeed, Mike, the seasonal gap for UV Per is a problem, typically extending from early April until nearly July 1st each year. However, it should really be rather less than this since the variable is fairly reasonably placed for observation low in the NNE sky from early June on at mid northern latitudes if the observer has a good horizon. Still, when all things are considered, what are the odds of having the very first observation of the new season being of this rarely active star in outburst?

Considering the large magnitude range that UV has and the fact that "normal" outbursts may last 3-4 days, perhaps even less, the situation begs the question of just how many of its fainter (normal) outbursts may have been missed in the span of years? Certainly the AAVSO lightcurve for the past decade implies that there may cetainly have been some.

BRJ

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