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ASAS J174600-2321.3

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stellakafka
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ASAS J174600-2321.3

A great paper, with new AAVSO data on the symbiotic nova ASAS J174600-2321.3, presenting in-eclipse variability! http://arxiv.org/abs/1512.01467

 

Best wishes - clear skies,

Stella.

shuemmerich
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Dear Stella, thank you for

Dear Stella,

thank you for the kind words on our paper. smiley ASAS J174600-2321.3 is quite a fascinating object, to be sure!

Let me stress that this research would not have been possible without the dedicated efforts of AAVSO observers who contributed to the corresponding campaign (Alert Notice 510). This is much appreciated, indeed! We're looking forward to monitoring the next eclipse in early 2018.

Best wishes,

Stefan Hümmerich

stellakafka
stellakafka's picture
Great work!

Dear Stefan,

 

I am grateful for your (and your colelagues') work and paper! Eclipsing accreting objects are rare, and very precious to understand accretion in such dynamic binaries. Perhaps we can have another multi-wavelength campaign in 2018? Something to think about :)

 

Best wishes - clear skies,

Stella. 

 

shuemmerich
shuemmerich's picture
Dear Stella, "Perhaps we can

Dear Stella,

"Perhaps we can have another multi-wavelength campaign in 2018? Something to think about :)"

Certainly! Actually, that is what I am hoping for... :-)

It would be awesome to have some spectroscopic coverage, too, in particular during the totality phase. However, given the faintness of the system during eclipse (V ~ 15.8 mag), this will be a very difficult task, indeed.

On a sidenote, spectroscopic observations at maximum brightness would also be desirable in order to check whether the symbiotic system has evolved towards higher effective temperature, as would be expected.

Best wishes,

Stefan

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