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classical nova

Alert Notice 531: Nova Ophiuchi 2015 Number 2 = TCP J17344775-2409042

October 14, 2015

Event: Nova Oph 2015 No. 2 = TCP J17344775-2409042

Independent discovery by:  
 - Koichi Nishiyama (Kurume, Japan) and Fujio Kabashima (Miyaki, Japan)
 - Shigehisa Fujikawa (Kan'onji, Kagawa, Japan)

Discovery magnitude:
 - Nishiyama and Kabashima: 11.8 unfiltered (CCD, using a 135-mm f/4 camera lens (+FLI 09000 camera))
 - Fujikawa: 12.1 unfiltered (CCD using a MINOLTA F 3.5 f 120mm lens)

Alert Notice 512: Nova Sagittarii 2015 No. 2 = PNV J18365700-2855420

March 16, 2015

Event: Nova Sagittarii 2015 No. 2 = PNV J18365700-2855420

Discovered by: John Seach, Chatsworth Island, NSW, Australia

Discovery magnitude: 6.0 using DSLR and 50mm f/1.0 lens

Discovery date: 2015 March 15.634 UT

Coordinates:  R.A. 18 36 56.84   Dec. -28 55 39.8  (2000.0)

Alert Notice 509: Nova Sagittarii 2015 = PNV J18142514-2554343

February 18, 2015

Event: Nova Sagittarii 2015 = PNV J18142514-2554343

Discovered independently by:
- Hideo Nishimura (Shizuoka-ken, Japan)
- Koichi Nishiyama (Kurume, Japan) and Fujio Kabashima (Miyaki, Japan)

Discovery magnitude:
- Nishimura: DSLR magnitude 11.2, using 200-mm f/3.2 lens + digital camera
- Nishiyama and Kabashima: unfiltered CCD magnitude 10.9, using a 105-mm f/4 camera lens (+SBIG STL6303E camera)

Special Notice #202: Classical nova event in V407 Cyg

March 14, 2010: Further to Munari et al. (CBET 2204, D.W.E. Green, editor), the presumed symbiotic star V407 Cyg is exhibiting spectral features clearly indicating a classical nova of the He/N type. This strongly suggests that the white dwarf component of the system is currently undergoing a nova outburst rather than a symbiotic-type outburst. The spectral evolution of this nova may be very fast given the likely large mass loss rate of the Mira-type donor star. We urgently request observations of V407 Cyg to provide photometric coverage of this unique event.

Alert Notice 500: Novae in Scorpius and Cygnus

April 2, 2014

1. Nova Scorpii 2014 = TCP J17154683-3128303
2. Nova Cygni 2014 = PNV J20214234+3103296

1. Nova Scorpii 2014 = TCP J17154683-3128303

Event: Nova Scorpii 2014 = TCP J17154683-3128303

Discovered by: Koichi Nishiyama (Kurume, Japan) and Fujio Kabashima (Miyaki, Japan)

Discovery magnitude: magnitude 10.1 unfiltered CCD, using a 105-mm f/4 camera lens (+SBIG STL6303E camera)

Nova Delphini 2013: The story so far

Nova Delphini 2013 (also named V339 Del) is the biggest cosmic event in variable star astronomy this year, and this naked-eye nova is providing the community a wealth of new data on this important class of objects.  The amateur astronomical community has made an enormous contribution of data for Nova Del so far, and now is a good time to review all that's happened so far in this nova outburst, and how the amateur community has played a role.

AAVSO Alert Notice 489: Nova Delphini 2013 = PNV J20233073+2046041

August 16, 2013

Event: Nova Del 2013 = PNV J20233073+2046041

Discovered by: Koichi Itagaki (Teppo-cho, Yamagata, Japan), reported by S. Nakano (Sumoto, Japan)

Discovery Magnitude: unfiltered CCD magnitude mag 6.8 using a 0.18-m reflector

Discovery date: 2013 Aug. 14.584 UT

Coordinates: R.A. 20 23 30.73  Decl. +20 46 04.1  (2000.0)

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