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Nova Del 2013

What's in store for Nova Del 2013?

No one knows what Nova Del 2013 will do next, but there are some tantalizing possibilities. 

The current AAVSO light curve for Nova Del 2013

So far it appears Nova Del 2013 is a 'slow nova', type NB in VSX. By definition, it takes 150 days or more for a slow nova to fade by 3 magnitudes. 

Sometimes "or more" can mean a lot of other exciting goings on.

Nova Del 2013

Welcome, fans of Nova Del 2013!

Below is a listing of the various AAVSO publications, posts, and articles on the new bright nova in Delphinus.  Use the links on the right side of the page to find out more about the AAVSO and how you can get in on the action. 

Clear skies!



AAVSO Alert Notice 489: Nova Delphini 2013 = PNV J20233073+2046041

August 16, 2013

Event: Nova Del 2013 = PNV J20233073+2046041

Discovered by: Koichi Itagaki (Teppo-cho, Yamagata, Japan), reported by S. Nakano (Sumoto, Japan)

Discovery Magnitude: unfiltered CCD magnitude mag 6.8 using a 0.18-m reflector

Discovery date: 2013 Aug. 14.584 UT

Coordinates: R.A. 20 23 30.73  Decl. +20 46 04.1  (2000.0)

Binocular Sequence and Charts Now Available for Nova Del 2013

Due to the very bright eruption of Nova Del 2013, we have created a binocular sequence specifically for this nova that can be plotted using the Binocular Chart option on the chart plotter (VSP). 

For best results specify a field of view of 900 arc minutes (15 degrees) and a limiting magnitude of 7 and click on the Binocular Chart option. This will produce an uncluttered chart with a sequence from 6.9 - 3.5V for use with binoculars. Or you may simply download the chart attached to this page.

AAVSO 49 Bay State Rd. Cambridge, MA 02138 617-354-0484