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Special Notice 410: Upcoming HST observations of V5668 Sgr

Note: this text is slightly different than the emailed version.  No technical information was changed.

Special Notice #405: Request for Monitoring of V4641 Sgr

August 4, 2015:  Dr. Gregory Sivakoff (U. of Alberta) has requested optical monitoring of the galactic microquasar V4641 Sgr beginning immediately, and continuing for the next 120 days, or until it is no longer observable from your location.

Alert Notice 508: Nova Scorpii 2015 == PNV J17032620-3504140

February 17, 2015

Event: Nova Scorpii 2015 = PNV J17032620-3504140

Discovered by: Tadashi Kojima, Gunma-ken, Japan

Discovery magnitude: unfiltered DSLR magnitude 8.1, using a 150-mm f/2.8 lens and digital camera

Discovery date: 2015 February 11.837 UT

Coordinates: RA: 17 03 26.18 , Decl: -35 04 17.6

Special Notice #398: Bright Transient in Sgr (PNV J18142514-2554343)

February 13, 20115:  Patrick Schmeer (SPK, Bischmisheim, Germany) reports the announcement on the CBAT Transient Object Confirmation Page (TOCP) of the discovery of a bright transient in Sgr on 2015 February 12.852 at an unfiltered magnitude of 10.9 by K. Nishiyama, using a 105-mm f/4 camera lens with an SBIG STL6303E CCD camera.  Nishiyama notes nothing is present on a previous image from 2015 February 02.887.  The transient has been independently confirmed with two pre-discovery images: by H.

What's in store for Nova Del 2013?

No one knows what Nova Del 2013 will do next, but there are some tantalizing possibilities. 

The current AAVSO light curve for Nova Del 2013

So far it appears Nova Del 2013 is a 'slow nova', type NB in VSX. By definition, it takes 150 days or more for a slow nova to fade by 3 magnitudes. 

Sometimes "or more" can mean a lot of other exciting goings on.

Events from the AAVSO Spring Meeting Broadcast Online!

For those who could not attend the AAVSO 2013 Spring Meeting in person but wish to take part, we will be broadcasting the following 2 events via GoToWebinar:

Talk by AAVSO Vice President Jeno Sokoloski

"Working Together to Understand Novae"

Friday, May 17 at 11:00am EDT (15:00 UT)

Suggested Observing Cadences for Variable Star Types

Something you need to consider carefully, and a question that comes up often with new observers is "How often should I observe my program stars?" The answers depend largely on the type of stars you are observing. The following table is a general guideline. As you learn more about the different types of variables, and the personalities of some of the specific stars you choose to observe, you may decide to observe them more or less often than suggested here.

Variable Type

Cadence in days

Active Galaxies (AGN)



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