Skip to main content

variable star

anything about variable stars

Special Notice #36: Variable Star in Triangulum Australe (1612-60 VAR TRA 07)

March 8, 2007

A variable star has been discoved in TrA, according to the Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams (CBET No. 867, Daniel W. E. Green, ed.):

"C. Jacques, Belo Horizonte, Brazil, reports that C. Colesanti, E. Pimentel, T. Napoleao, and he have found a previously unknown variable star on CCD images obtained in the course of the Brazilian Supernovae Survey (cf. IAUC 8482). The new object is located at

R.A. = 16h20m50s.18, Decl. = -60d23'39".5 (equinox 2000.0).

Special Notice #22: Bright New Variable in Cassiopeia

October 31, 2006

Daniel W. E. Green, Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams, reports (Central Bureau Electronic Telegram 711) that S. Nakano, Sumoto, Japan, reports the discovery of a brightening star in Cassiopeia by Akihiko Tago, Ayabe, Tsuyama, Okayama-ken, Japan. Unfiltered CCD observations by Tago include October 25.538 UT, 10.7; 27.409, 10.5; 30.411, 8.8; 31.469, 7.5. Tago used a 70-mm f/3.2 lens and a Canon EOS 20Da digital camera (limiting magnitude 12).

Special Notice #21: Possible New Object In Tau

October 26, 2006

Dan Green has asked for confirmation of a new object reported to the Central Bureau for Astronomical Telegrams by astronomers at Crni Vrh Observatory of the University of Ljubljana, Slovenia. Here are details:

position (2000): R.A. 03:29:12.26 Dec. +12:50:17.6 (Taurus)

magnitude: ~R magnitude ~14.9 (unfiltered CCD, approx. R magnitude)

date: Oct. 20.0 UT (4 images taken with 60-cm instrument)

Star names containing the Greek letters µ and ν, and the case of “u” versus “U”

When searching for a star in the International Variable Star Index (VSX) or reporting observations to the AAVSO International Database via WebObs, it is not possible to enter a Greek letter if the star has a Greek letter as part of its name – one cannot search for “µ Cep” or “ν Pav”. There has been ongoing confusion about how to spell out some of the Greek letters used in star names, and in particular about how to spell out µ and ν.

RR Lyrae

RR Lyrae, 1 degree field, DSS I survey plate
(copyright 1993-1995 CalTech/STScI)

V723 Cas (Nova Cassiopeiae 1995)

V723 Cas was discovered by M. Yamamoto, Okazaki, Aichi, Japan, on 1995 August 24.57 UT at photographic magnitude 9.2. The finding was made using a 200-mm f/4.0 lens, PO0 filter, and T-Max 400 film. A report by G.V. Williams of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics shows percursory evidence of this nova located on the Palomar red plate of magnitude 18-19, as seen using the Digital Sky Survey (AAVSO Alert Notices 213, 214, 217, 218, 230; IAUC 6213).

V4362 Sgr (Nova Sagittarii 1994 No. 2)

V4362 (Nova Sagittarii 1994 No. 2)

V1974 Cyg (Nova Cygni 1992)

V1974 Cyg (Nova Cygni 1992)

Nova Cygni 1992
A 1994 Hubble Space Telescope image of the expanding shell of gas expelled by Nova Cygni 1992. Credit: NASA, ESA, HST, F. Paresce, R. Jedrzejewski (STScI)


AAVSO 49 Bay State Rd. Cambridge, MA 02138 617-354-0484