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Update of the LPV Section Web Page

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Andrew Pearce
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Update of the LPV Section Web Page

Hi All

Just to let you know that the LPV section web page has recently been updated.  This includes a new LPV of the Month for July which is the interesting star T UMi.  Thanks for Frank Schorr for putting this together.

If anyone would like to contribute a brief article on their favourite LPV, then we would be very keen to hear from you!

Enjoy the page and if there's anything in particular you'd like to see on it, please contact us.

Regards

Andrew Pearce (PEX)

stellakafka
stellakafka's picture
Great job!

Thank you to all involved in updating the LPV observing section - great job! I can't wait to see more contributions to the "LPV of the month" page - and I would like to invite you all to write a paragraph about your favorite star. This is a great way for our community to learn from eachother's experience!

Best wishes - clear skies,

Stella.

 

 

percyjoh
percyjoh's picture
Update of LPV Web Page

Thank you for doing this!  As you may know, my students and I have been busy analyzing data on stars in the AAVSO LPV observing programs.  Almost all of this is published in JAAVSO.  See, for instance: volume 44, 72; 43, 223; 43, 118; 42, 245; 42, 1; 41, 193; 41, 1; 41, 15; 39, 1; 38, 161; 37, 71.  I particularly recommend 41, 193 by Percy & Abachi which reports an exciting (to me) new discovery about LPVs.  Also 39, 1 by Percy & Terziev which suggests many stars on the program which should or should not be observed.  This summer, Henry Leung and I are looking at two samples of LPVs: the ones on the AAVSO PEP program, and the ones on the binocular program.  All this is made possible by the work of AAVSO observers!  Stay tuned for our results!

John Percy

potterrb
potterrb's picture
Binocular program

I would be especially interested in your findings on the binocular observing program stars. I am a frequent binocular observer. I often wonder if some of the targets on the list are really worth observing, given their narrow range of variation and scatter in the light curves (although I imagine some light curve analysis may reveal some periodicity/regularity even from these binocular observations). If you are looking for help, I would be willing to take on some analysis assignments on cloudy nights!

percyjoh
percyjoh's picture
Binocular LPV Program

My student Henry Leung is still working on the binocular stars.  Even though they seem to have small amplitudes, and scatter in the light curve, they still produce excellent results, thanks to the "black art" of time-series analysis.  We detect pulsation periods and, in about a third of the stars, "long secondary periods" whose nature is stilll not known.  We can detect amplitudes of a few hundredths of a magnitude in these stars.  So keep up the good observations!

   As Henry is working on the binocular stars, I am studying the LPVs which Janet Mattei and I placed on the PEP program, back in the 1980's, because their amplitudes were rather small.  For these,, we have both visual and V data, and we are able to detect amplitudes down to 0.03 mag.  We should be writing this up for JAAVSO by September.

 

John Percy

rglassner
"Higher Priority" Variables

I started observing variable stars in 2015 using binoculars.  Your articles (Percy) have been helpful in determing which stars to include in my observing program.  In particular your series ending in, JAAVSO, Vol. 39, 1 (Percy & Terziev) has shown me that certain variables are appropriate for continued observations and certain variables do not need continued observations.  I appreciate that information and have included "Higher Priority" variables from Table 2 such as VY UMA, PSI 1 AUR, and AT DRA in my program.  All of the variables that are included in my program come from the PEP and/or Binocular Program Lists and I appreciate your (Percy) efforts in developing one or both of these lists.  I look forward to your continued studies of variables from these AAVSO program lists and hope that consideration can be given to updating these lists based on your past and future recommendations.      

 Rich GRIB

 

    

percyjoh
percyjoh's picture
"Higher Priority" Irregular LPVs

Keep in mind that "higher priority" is relative.  The lower-priority stars -- non-variable and microvariable -- are definitely low priority, especially for visual observing.  But even the higher-priority stars will be a bit of a challenge, since they are classified as irregular (L type).  But keep up the observations, and I will try to reanalyze them in a year or two.

 

John Percy

Andrew Pearce
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New LPV of the Month Article

Hi All

We've included a new LPV of the Month article on the web page.  The LPV for August is RS Eri and we hope you find the article interesting.  If anyone would like to write a brief story on their favourite LPV, we'd very much like to hear from you.

Regards

Andrew Pearce

Andrew Pearce
Andrew Pearce's picture
September LPV of the month

Hi All

Frank Schorr has written an interesting piece this month on LX Cyg.  This is an LPV which has displayed pronounced changes in it's period in a relatively short space of time.  I'd encourage you to read the article and consider adding this interesting star to your observing program.

If anyone would like to contribute a brief article on their favourite LPV, we'd be very happy to hear from you.

Regards

Andrew Pearce (PEX)

paw
paw's picture
Hi Andrew, I spelt your name

Hi Andrew, I spelt your name wrong in AS&T. Appologies! A bad mistake.

Best...

Andrew Pearce
Andrew Pearce's picture
October update of LPV Section web page

Hi All

Just to let you know that the LPV web page has recently been updated.  As well as a new LPV of the month (S Cep), thanks to Frank Schorr, we also have a very good article from Dr John Percy on why we should be observing LPV's.  John is a science advisor to the LPV section and we greatly appreciate his support.  I encourage you all to read John's piece which will hopefully encourage more observers to take up LPV observing!  Also we reference a very good article on forgotten Miras by members of the Variable Star Section of the Association of Swedish Amateur Astronomers (SAAF/V) which appears in the current edition of the JAAVSO.

Enjoy!

Andrew

Andrew Pearce
Andrew Pearce's picture
November update of LPV Section web page

Hi All

Just to let you know that the LPV web page has recently been updated.  As well as a new LPV of the month (TT Cen), we have set up a new page entitled "Why observe LPV's?" based on the article provided by John Percy last month.  We also plan to revisit the LPV Legacy and Program stars lists which were first put together about 7-8 years ago.  This may include the addition of a few more stars.  Currently there's not many southen LPV's included and provided we confirm that some of these southen LPV's have a significant observational history and some professional interest, we may look at including them formally on the lists.

Regards

Andrew

Andrew Pearce
Andrew Pearce's picture
December update of LPV Section web page

Hi All

Just to let you know that the LPV section web page has recently been updated.  This includes a new LPV of the Month for December which is the interesting star R Aur.  

If anyone would like to contribute a brief article on their favourite LPV, then we would be very keen to hear from you!

Regards

Andrew

hhu
hhu's picture
R Aur

Hello Andrew,

very good and interresting article. 

Regards, Hubert

Andrew Pearce
Andrew Pearce's picture
January update of LPV Section web page

Thanks Hubert

The feedback is appreciated.  The page has been recently updated and the LPV for the month of January is RS Cyg.  Check it out!

Regards

Andrew

Andrew Pearce
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February update of the LPV Section web page

Hi All

Just to let you know that there has been an update of the LPV Section web page.  The LPV of the month is U UMi.

During January, I completed work on reviewing the LPV Legacy stars list.  This was originally developed back in 2009 by Mike Simonsen and Kate Hutton.  They did a great job in identifying important LPV's to follow to ensure that we continue the long observational history of these stars and they reflect the long tradition of the AAVSO.  

Using the same 2009 criteria developed by Mike and Kate for defining the Legacy list, I have identified a further 21 stars which have been added to the Legacy list.  

The current list of AAVSO Legacy Stars can be found in our file section (the file is titled "AAVSO Legacy LPVs 2017 Update").

The vast majority of LPV's in the legacy list are north of the celestial equator which is understandable given most observers have been located in the northern hemisphere.  However to ensure there is sufficient coverage south of the celestial equator, a separate legacy list has been developed for LPV's south of declination 20S (southern stars in the existing liegacy list will remain there, so this new list just contains additional stars).  The selection criteria as first proposed by Mike and Kate remains, however it is necessary to relax the criteria somewhat.  All stars on this southern list have been under observations since before 1950, have over 5,000 observations in the AID and have been referenced in over 50 scientific publications over the years.  This resulted in a list of approximately 30 stars and again is a subset of the original Pickering program list.

The current list of AAVSO Legacy Stars South can be found in our file section (the file is titled "AAVSO Legacy  South").

It should also be noted that the LPV Legacy star list and LPV Legacy South list can all be searched in VSX under "Campaign or Program".

As always, we're happy to receive any feedback as to what observers would like to see on the web page.

Regards

Andrew

paw
paw's picture
Legacy South

Thanks Andrew. I do a handfull of these already. I'll try and do those better before taking any new ones on.

Best. Alan.

Andrew Pearce
Andrew Pearce's picture
March Update of the LPV Section Web Page

Hi All

The web page has been updated again.  The LPV of the Month for March is R Lep.

One of the LPV Section Science Advisors and JAAVSO Editor, Dr John Percy, has put together a list of pulsating red giants that have and continue to show interesting and/or unusual behaviour.  We would like to promote the stars that appear on John's list as worthy of  intense coverage for all observers, visual observers in particular.  The list includes many stars which are currently on the LPV Legacy and Legacy South lists as well (highlighted in yellow in the file).  The March LPV of the Month, R Lep, appears on John's list.

The list has been designated "The Percy List" and can be found in our file section (the file is titled "The Percy List.pdf").

Enjoy!

Regards

Andrew

hhu
hhu's picture
Hi Andrew, thanks for the

Hi Andrew, thanks for the update. Just 1 comment: the link to the LPV forum in the text does not work

 

weo
weo's picture
LPV link fixed

Thanks for letting us know about the link to the LPV forum, Hubert. It's fixed and working now.

Good observing,

Elizabeth

Andrew Pearce
Andrew Pearce's picture
April update of the LPV Section web page

Hi All

Just to let you know that the LPV Section web page has been updated and the LPV of the Month for April is V Hya. This article was provided by Mike Soukup which we greatly appreciate.  I hope this generates some interest in more detailed coverage of this fascinating LPV.

Regards

Andrew (PEX)

hhu
hhu's picture
V Hya

Hi Andrew, 

very interesting article. It looks indeed a fascinating LPV.  Sadly to low from my observing place.

Andrew Pearce
Andrew Pearce's picture
May update of the LPV Section web page

Hi All

Just to let you know that the LPV Section web page has been updated and the LPV of the Month for May is R Hya. This article was provided by Frank Schorr and is an interesting read on a fascinating LPV.

Regards

Andrew

Andrew Pearce
Andrew Pearce's picture
June update of the LPV Section web page

Hi All

Just to let you know that the LPV Section web page has been updated and the LPV of the Month for June is BH Cru. This article was provided by Frank Schorr and is an interesting read on an LPV with a short observational history but one that has shown appreciable changes in it's behaviour.

Regards

Andrew

Andrew Pearce
Andrew Pearce's picture
July update of the LPV Section web page

Hi All

Just to let you know that the LPV Section web page has been updated and the LPV of the Month for July is T Cas. This is an interesting northern sky LPV which displays a double maximum feature in it's light curve and there are not many of these types in the northern sky.

Regards

Andrew

Andrew Pearce
Andrew Pearce's picture
August update of the LPV Section web page

Hi All

Just to let you know that the LPV Section web page has been updated and the LPV of the Month for August is CT Lac. Thanks to Frank Schorr for putting together an interesting artcile on this star.

Regards

Andrew

hhu
hhu's picture
CT Lac

Nice article. I never observed this star but is seems worth to do it.

Clear skies.

Andrew Pearce
Andrew Pearce's picture
September update of the LPV Section web page

Hi All

The web page has been updated and the LPV for the Month for September is T Cam.

Also just to let you know that Alredo Glez-Herrera (GZN) has established a Facebook Long Period Variable group.  So far there's over 80 members of the group and will be a great way to provide more "immediate" news and views on all things LPV.  I'd encourage you to search and join the group if you have an interest in these fascinating stars.

Regards

Andrew

Andrew Pearce
Andrew Pearce's picture
October update of the LPV Section web page

Hi All

just to let everyone to know that the LPV of the month for October is R Aql. An interesting article has been supplied by Frank Schorr. Thanks Frank!

Do you have a favourite LPV? Do you fancy sharing your interest with the AAVSO community? A brief article is an excellent way to do this and doesn't require a physics or astronomy degree! As you can see from other monthly articles, the focus is on the observational history of the stars and leveraging off the AID dataset. I'd be happy to receive any articles from any member and observer.

Regards

Andrew

Andrew Pearce
Andrew Pearce's picture
November update of the LPV Section web page

Hi All

Just to let everyone to know that the LPV of the month for November is R Cnc. R Cnc is an interesting LPV which has shown a marked decrease in it's mean magnitude over the last 50 years or so and from my research, I can't find a very good explanation for this!

Again, I'd be happy to receive any articles from any member and observer on your favourite LPV.

Regards

Andrew

Andrew Pearce
Andrew Pearce's picture
LPV of the Month

Hi All

The article on R Cnc has been updated to reflect some great comments received from Stan Walker of the VSS.  Stan pointed out the pitfalls of analysing LPV's such as R Cnc with periods close to a calendar year.  Thanks Stan!

Regards

Andrew

 

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