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PNV in Scorpius

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PNV J17411305-3413235

According to TOCP website, Koichi Nishiyama and Fujio Kabashima report a discovery of possible nova (mag.= 11.1) in Scorpius.
More information is available at:

http://www.cbat.eps.harvard.edu/unconf/followups/J17411305-3413235.html

AAX

Possible LPV?
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Matthew Templeton
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This is still worth pursuing, but VizieR shows the existence of an IR source within 2 arcseconds of this position, and a star with spectral type M6.  This may be an uncataloged LPV.

Matthew

2MASS J17411309-3413226?
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Indeed, it seems this is 2MASS J17411309-3413226 which is quite bright in IR: J=7.968, K=5.566. 

J-K= 2.4, so it's a very red object.

Possible LPV?
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According to T. Yusa's measurements (remotely using an iTelescope0.43-m f/6.8), the b-v is +3.5

Just subjectively, it looks
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Just subjectively, it looks extremely red in the image at the link provided at the CBAT page.  Means nothing, perhaps.  GW

Special Notice #372 issued on this probable red variable
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AAVSO Special Notice #372 has been issued on this probable new red variable, IRAS 17378-3411 = PNV J17411305-3413235. Visual and multicolor observations, as well as spectroscopy, are requested.

Good observing  -  Elizabeth Waagen, AAVSO HQ

Correction to coordinates in Special Notice #372
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Bart Staels was kind enough to point out (thanks, Bart!) that there is a typo in the coordinates for IRAS 17378-3411 = PNV J17411305-3413235  in AAVSO Special Notice #372. The coordinates should be

RA 17 41 13.10  Dec. -34 13 22.6  (2000.0)


My apologies for the error!

Good observing  -  Elizabeth Waagen

pnvj17411305-3413235
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I took a spectra of this PNV last night. It certainly isn't a nova.

The spectra is of a late M star. There are no H emissions that are often present in Mira stars near maximum.

Some one with more knowledge than me migh be able to classify it.

http://i566.photobucket.com/albums/ss109/TCB168/PNVJ17411305-3413235_zps...

Cheers

Terry

It's an M star
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Matthew Templeton
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Great spectrum, Terry.

It's a late M star, no sign of emission typical of novae.  It's probably intrinsically red, with extinction on top of that.  Mass-losing pulsator, maybe?

Matthew

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