Skip to main content

The Runaway Binary LP 400-22 is Leaving the Galaxy

We recently released a significant update to the backend systems for the AAVSO website. While most of the bugs introduced by this update have been fixed, there may still be problems we haven't fixed. If you run into a problem, please email webmaster@aavso.org

CfA astronomers Warren Brown and Scott Kenyon and their colleagues decided to investigate the case of the peculiar runaway binary LP400-22. The binary pair was known to consist of two very evolved orbiting stars, so-called white dwarf stars, currently about 1400 light-years away from us. The object is unique in being the only known runaway white dwarf pair, and moreover its velocity is larger than most other runaway stars. The astronomers examined its motion across the sky over a period of five years and conclude from its path in the galaxy that it almost surely was not ejected from the vicinity of the galactic center. Moreover, they report that the supernovae mechanism is also very unlikely because there is no hint at X-ray wavelengths of the remnants of such a supernova. The team concludes that the probable origin of this binary pair is in a dense stellar cluster.

Read the full press release

Read the abstract and paper on arXiv

AAVSO 49 Bay State Rd. Cambridge, MA 02138 aavso@aavso.org 617-354-0484