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V404 Cyg

Alert Notice 592: V404 Cyg observations needed tonight for Chandra observations

August 11, 2017: Dr. Gregory Sivakoff (University of Alberta) and colleagues have requested AAVSO observers' assistance in observing the black hole X-ray transient LMXB V404 Cyg in support of Chandra observations taking place TONIGHT. The Chandra schedule is

2017 Aug 11 23:49:04.072  - 2017 Aug 12 13:42:14.730 UTC

AAVSO observers contribute to understanding the black hole binary V404 Cygni

Four AAVSO members listed as co-authors in Nature paper

V404 Cygni has been known as a variable star residing in the constellation Cygnus since the 18th century. It was believed to be a nova, a compact binary system containing a white dwarf primary and a sun-like secondary star, that undergoes unpredictable episodes of dramatic brightening - or 'outbursts' - before settling back down to quiescence for decades, until the next outburst. 

Alert Notice 523: Correction to AAVSO Alert Notice 522

July 1, 2015:  In AAVSO Alert Notice 522 on the upcoming observations of the black hole X-ray binary V404 Cyg by HST, the date of the detection by the Swift satellite was incorrectly given as 2015 June 16.77197 UT (Barthelmy et al., GCN Circular 17929). The correct date is 2015 June 15.77197 UT.

Our sincere apologies for this error!

Alert Notice 522: V404 Cyg HST multiwavelength observations scheduled

Correction: In the text below, the date of the detection by the Swift satellite was incorrectly given as 2015 June 16.77197 UT. The correct date is 2015 June 15.77197 UT.

Our sincere apologies for this error!

July 1, 2015:

Alert Notice 520: X-ray nova and LMXB V404 Cyg in rare outburst

Campaign extended until further notice: As V404 Cyg's behavior following outbursts is clearly unpredictable, AAVSO observers are asked to continue obtaining multicolor photometry as well as visual observations. - April 2017

June 18, 2015: V404 Cyg, an X-ray nova and a low mass X-ray binary (LMXB) with black hole component, is undergoing its first reported X-ray and optical outburst since 1989. Large scale, rapid variations are being reported in wavelengths from X-ray to radio by professional and amateur astronomers worldwide.

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