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Alert Notice 383: Nova Scorpii 2008

September 6, 2008

Event: Nova in Scorpius

Discovered By: K. Nishiyama (Kurume, Fukuoka-ken, Japan) and F. Kabashima (Miyaki-cho, Saga-ken, Japan); Y. Sakurai (Mito, Ibaraki-ken, Japan); and Guoyou Sun (Qufu, Shandong, China) and Xing Gao (Urumqi, Xinjiang, China)

Discovery Date: 2008 September 02.4594 UTC (JD 2454711.9594)

Discovery Magnitude: m = 9.5 (unfiltered)

Position: RA = 17h 57m 32.93s , Dec = -30d 43m 10.1s (from Nishiyama and Kabashima)

Nova Delphini 2013: The story so far

Nova Delphini 2013 (also named V339 Del) is the biggest cosmic event in variable star astronomy this year, and this naked-eye nova is providing the community a wealth of new data on this important class of objects.  The amateur astronomical community has made an enormous contribution of data for Nova Del so far, and now is a good time to review all that's happened so far in this nova outburst, and how the amateur community has played a role.

Alert Notice 409: V5584 Sgr = Nova Sagittarii 2009 Number 4

October 29, 2009

 

Event: Nova in Sagittarius (V5584 Sgr = N Sgr 2009 No. 4)

Discovered By: Koichi Nishiyama, Kurume, Fukuoka-ken, Japan, and F. Kabashima, Miyaki-cho, Saga-ken, Japan

Discovery Date: Oct. 26.439 UT (two frames from Oct. 26.439 and 26.440)

Discovery Magnitude: unfiltered CCD magnitude 9.3, using a 105-mm f/4 camera lens

What's in store for Nova Del 2013?

No one knows what Nova Del 2013 will do next, but there are some tantalizing possibilities. 

The current AAVSO light curve for Nova Del 2013

So far it appears Nova Del 2013 is a 'slow nova', type NB in VSX. By definition, it takes 150 days or more for a slow nova to fade by 3 magnitudes. 

Sometimes "or more" can mean a lot of other exciting goings on.

Nova Del 2013

Welcome, fans of Nova Del 2013!

Below is a listing of the various AAVSO publications, posts, and articles on the new bright nova in Delphinus.  Use the links on the right side of the page to find out more about the AAVSO and how you can get in on the action. 

Clear skies!

 

Publications:

Binocular Sequence and Charts Now Available for Nova Del 2013

Due to the very bright eruption of Nova Del 2013, we have created a binocular sequence specifically for this nova that can be plotted using the Binocular Chart option on the chart plotter (VSP). 

For best results specify a field of view of 900 arc minutes (15 degrees) and a limiting magnitude of 7 and click on the Binocular Chart option. This will produce an uncluttered chart with a sequence from 6.9 - 3.5V for use with binoculars. Or you may simply download the chart attached to this page.

Alert Notice 421: Nova in Scorpius (V1311 Sco = N Sco 2010 No. 2)

May 5, 2010
 
Event: Nova in Scorpius (V1311 Sco = Nova Sco 2010 No. 2)
 
Discovered Idependently By:
- Koichi Nishiyama, Kurume, Japan, and Fujio Kabashima, Miyaki, Japan
- Hideo Nishimura, Miyawaki, Kakegawa, Shizuoka-ken, Japan (reported via S. Nakano, Sumoto, Japan, in CBET 2262)
- Tadashi Kojima, Tsumagoi, Agatsuma-gun, Gunma-ken, Japan (reported via S. Nakano, Sumoto, Japan, in CBET 2262)

Alert Notice 420: Nova in Sagittarius (V5586 Sgr = Nova Sgr 2010 No. 2)

April 26, 2010


Event: Nova in Sagittarius (V5586 Sgr = Nova Sgr 2010 No. 2)

Discovered By: Koichi Nishiyama, Kurume, Japan, and Fujio Kabashima, Miyaki, Japan

Discovery Date: Apr. 23.782 UT using a 105-mm f/4 camera lens (+ SBIG STL6303E camera)

Discovery Magnitude: unfiltered CCD magnitude 11.2

Alert Notice 419: Nova eruption in V407 Cyg

March 15, 2010: According to CBET 2199, 2204, and 2205, the suspected symbiotic star V407 Cyg has been observed in an anomalously bright outburst, and subsequent spectroscopic observations by multiple observers show clear signs of a classical nova. Observations of this anomalous event are requested immediately, and observers are asked to continue observing this object until it returns to its previous quiescent level.

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