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Bright classical Nova in Sagittarius

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Robin Leadbeater
Bright classical Nova in Sagittarius

http://www.aavso.org/requesting-monitoring-bright-new-nova-sagittarius

An interesting and straightforward target for the Star Analyser if (unlike me) you are far enough south

Robin

HQA
HQA's picture
SA200

Hi Robin,

We have gratings on both BSM South (Melbourne) and BSM Berry (Perth).  Unfortunately, both sites have been cloudy!  When it clears, I'll have the nova on their monitoring queue.  The eShel is also installed at Mt. John, and could do something this bright on the 61cm.  I'll see if we can get some time to try it out.

Arne

Robin Leadbeater
eShel spectrum

Hi Arne,

Christian Buil has just posted an R ~11000 echelle spectrum using 200mm aperture from South of France.

http://www.spectro-aras.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=5&t=1108&p=4989#p4989

It will be interesting to see how far it can be followed at high resolution from more southerly observatories.  

Robin

PJOC
PJOC's picture
Low-res spectrum

Here's my first effort on this target, with the 150 l/mm grating on mt Spectra-L200,  Dispersion is about 3.8 A/pixel, with resolution R=260. 

Cheers

Jonthan

PJOC
PJOC's picture
Here is 2 hrs data on the

Here is 2 hrs data on the region 4770-5190, showing the H Beta and several of the iron lines.  JD 2457098.2097
 
Ejecta velocity c.1100 km/s in this spectrum.
 
Cheers
 

Jonathan

Carl Knight
Carl Knight's picture
Nice detail...

Jonathan, very well done!

I have one of the SA 200's but I'm under cloud (what is left of Tropical Cyclone Pam) I'm afraid!

- Carl.

 

Ken4optics
Well done Jonathan! I think

Well done Jonathan!

I think these respesent the first (of many!) amateur spectra of the Nova.

The "iron curtain" is very similar to the recent Nova Cen.

Excellent results.

 

Robin Leadbeater
Star Analyser spectrum

A nice Star Analyser spectrum of this nova from South Africa by Jerome Jooste

https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/staranalyser/conversations/messages/...

Robin

hambsch
hambsch's picture
SA200

Hi,

I planned a couple of days ago to take a SA200 spectrum of the new nova, but since then evn in Chile there are clouds.

So far hence no spectrum. Maybe during this night or I hope at least somewhen in the weekend it should be able to work out.

Josch (HMB)

Ken4optics
Using a SA100 grating on a

Using a SA100 grating on a 200mm telelens gave good results - This is from Rob in regional Victoria, Australia.

http://www.iceinspace.com.au/forum/showthread.php?t=132920

PJOC
PJOC's picture
Here is a low-resolution

Here is a low-resolution spectrum from 18-3, and a comparison of the central section of the low-res spectra from 18-3 and 16-3. Interesting to observe the deepening of the P Cyg profiles and the reduction in expansion velocity over those two days.

I have a higher resolution (R=8000) spectrum of the 6800-7200 to process from last night.

malclocke
My spectrum of the H_beta

My spectrum of the H_beta region from 2015/Mar/20.634.  R ~ 9000.

Seems to still be brightening, I made a visual estimate at 4.9 at the time I was taking this.

ocn
ocn's picture
Bright Classical Nova in Sagittarius

Hi All,

Looking at the observations being reported to the AAVSO for N Sgr 2015 no.2  (000-BLP-536), this nova has continued to brighten to about 4.5v with no indication the maximum has been reached yet. According to available VSX data on all other novae that have been observed in Sgr since about 1898 (there are many) , our current bright example may end up breaking a maximum apparent magnitude record for novae in Sagittarius currently held by V1059 Sgr (Na1898, max 4.5:p) and V630 Sgr (Na1936, max 4.5p in the Downes Catalog and other VSX references). I'm not sure where the VSX magnitude 1.6  maximum quoted for V630 Sgr comes from. Perhaps someone knows.

Steve

     

 

 

PJOC
PJOC's picture
Here is a low-resolution (150

Here is a low-resolution (150 l/mm, R=c.700) spectrum from last night:

 

 

It's extraordinary how much change there has been.  The emission lines have all but disappeared - seemingly swamped by deep, broad P Cygni absorption lines.  Predominant lines appear to be CI, OI, and FeII.  I'm not sure what the strong absorption feature is at 5875 - I'm guessing it's the NaI at 5890 blueshifted.

I've never seen a P Cyg profile like the one at Ha.

stellakafka
stellakafka's picture
spectra

There is a HeI line at 5876 which is usually in absorption in nova-likes. I can't see your spectrum though - is there a link where it is displayed?

 

Thanks,

Stella. 

PJOC
PJOC's picture
Images

I've been told the image didn't come out in my last post.  Trying again:

 

Ivan Bryukhanov
BISA

Hi all,

For public use suggest measurement series on the all sky camera images.

PNV J18365700-2855420    2457109.23403    2015 Mar 27.7340    5.12    0.05    CV    SAO 210509        SAO 210857        K    N        all-sky photometry, limit= 6.8m, STARRY SKY!!
PNV J18365700-2855420    2457108.73403    2015 Mar 27.2340    5.25    0.07    CV    SAO 210857        SAO 186838        K    N        all-sky photometry, limit= 5.4m, ZIRRUS !!!
PNV J18365700-2855420    2457108.76181    2015 Mar 27.2618    5.19    0.07    CV    SAO 210857        SAO 186838        K    N        all-sky photometry, limit= 6.0m, ZIRRUS !!!
PNV J18365700-2855420    2457108.25000    2015 Mar 26.7500    5.6    0.12    CV    SAO 210857        SAO 186838        K    N        all-sky photometry, limit= 6.3m, ZIRRUS !!!
PNV J18365700-2855420    2457107.90417    2015 Mar 26.4042    5.68    0.05    CV    SAO 210857        SAO 186838        K    N        all-sky photometry, limit= 6.7m, STARRY SKY!!
PNV J18365700-2855420    2457107.25347    2015 Mar 25.7535    5.95    0.05    CV    SAO 210857        SAO 186838        K    N        all-sky photometry, limit= 6.9m, STARRY SKY!!
PNV J18365700-2855420    2457107.30903    2015 Mar 25.8090    6.12    0.1    CV    SAO 210857        SAO 186838        K    N        all-sky photometry, limit= 6.7m, STARRY SKY!!
PNV J18365700-2855420    2457106.84375    2015 Mar 25.3438    6.0    0.12    CV    SAO 210857        SAO 186838        K    N        all-sky photometry, limit= 6.4m, ZIRRUS !!!
PNV J18365700-2855420    2457106.28194    2015 Mar 24.7819    5.85    0.12    CV    SAO 210857        SAO 186838        K    N        all-sky photometry, limit= 6.7m, STARRY SKY!! ZIRRUS???
PNV J18365700-2855420    2457105.85625    2015 Mar 24.3563    5.7    0.12    CV    SAO 210857        SAO 186838        K    N        all-sky photometry, limit= 6.4m, ZIRRUS !!! STARRY SKY.
PNV J18365700-2855420    2457105.85625    2015 Mar 24.3563    5.8    0.1    CV    SAO 210857        SAO 186838        K    N        all-sky photometry, limit= 6.4m, ZIRRUS!!! STARRY SKY.
PNV J18365700-2855420    2457105.31667    2015 Mar 23.8167    5.84    0.07    CV    SAO 210857        SAO 186838        K    N        all-sky photometry, limit= 6.9m, STARRY SKY!!

PNV J18365700-2855420    2457105.23264    2015 Mar 23.7326    5.62    0.1    CV    SAO 210257        SAO 210116        K    N        all-sky photometry, limit= 6.7m, STARRY SKY!!
PNV J18365700-2855420    2457104.88542    2015 Mar 23.3854    5.3    0.12    CV    SAO 210509        SAO 210257        K    N        all-sky photometry, limit=5.7m, ZIRRUS!!! ZENIT !!!
PNV J18365700-2855420    2457104.17222    2015 Mar 22.6722    4.95    0.12    CV    SAO 210509        SAO 210257        K    N        all-sky photometry, limit= 5.4m, ZIRRUS !!!!
PNV J18365700-2855420    2457103.83681    2015 Mar 22.3368    5.05    0.12    CV    SAO 210509        SAO 210257        K    N        all-sky photometry, limit= 5.9m, ZIRRUS !!!
PNV J18365700-2855420    2457103.23611    2015 Mar 21.7361    4.55    0.05    CV    SAO 210509        SAO 210257        K    N        all-sky photometry, limit= 6.9m, STARRY SKY!!
PNV J18365700-2855420    2457103.26181    2015 Mar 21.7618    4.58    0.07    CV    SAO 210509        SAO 210257        K    N        all-sky photometry, limit= 7.0 m, STARRY SKY!!
PNV J18365700-2855420    2457103.32083    2015 Mar 21.8208    4.63    0.05    CV    SAO 210509        SAO 210257        K    N        all-sky photometry, limit= 6.2m, STARRY SKY!!
PNV J18365700-2855420    2457102.90417    2015 Mar 21.4042    4.55    0.05    CV    SAO 210509        SAO 210257        K    N        all-sky photometry, limit= 6.3m, STARRY SKY!!
PNV J18365700-2855420    2457102.88542    2015 Mar 21.3854    4.5    0.1    CV    SAO 210509        SAO 210257        K    N        all-sky photometry, limit= 6.9m, STARRY SKY!!
PNV J18365700-2855420    2457102.85208    2015 Mar 21.3521    4.58    0.05    CV    SAO 210509        SAO 210257        K    N        all-sky photometry, limit= 6.9m, STARRY SKY!!
PNV J18365700-2855420    2457102.84167    2015 Mar 21.3417    4.73    0.05    CV    SAO 210509        SAO 210257        K    N        all-sky photometry, limit= 6.7m, STARRY SKY!!
PNV J18365700-2855420    2457102.27014    2015 Mar 20.7701    4.86    0.07    CV    SAO 210509        SAO 210257        K    N        all-sky photometry, limit= 6.9m, STARRY SKY!!
PNV J18365700-2855420    2457101.81944    2015 Mar 20.3194    4.97    0.07    CV    SAO 210509        SAO 210257        K    N        all-sky photometry, limit= 6.4m, ZIRRUS
PNV J18365700-2855420    2457101.24444    2015 Mar 19.7444    5.36    0.05    CV    SAO 210257        SAO 210116        K    N        all-sky photometry, limit= 6.9m, STARRY SKY!!
PNV J18365700-2855420    2457100.80556    2015 Mar 19.3056    5.42    0.07    CV    SAO 210257        SAO210116        K    N        all-sky photometry, limit= 6.3m, ZIRRUS
PNV J18365700-2855420    2457100.27083    2015 Mar 18.7708    5.55    0.07    CV    SAO 210116        SAO 187024        K    N        all-sky photometry, limit= 6.9m, STARRY SKY
PNV J18365700-2855420    2457100.21944    2015 Mar 18.7194    5.63    0.07    CV    SAO 210116        SAO 187024        K    N        all-sky photometry, limit= 6.9m, STARRY SKY
PNV J18365700-2855420    2457099.89444    2015 Mar 18.3944    5.68    0.07    CV    SAO 210116        SAO 187024        K    N        all-sky photometry, limit= 6.3m
PNV J18365700-2855420    2457099.81667    2015 Mar 18.3167    5.82    0.07    CV    SAO 210116        SAO 187024        K    N        all-sky photometry, limit= 6.4m
PNV J18365700-2855420    2457099.31597    2015 Mar 17.8160    5.73    0.07    CV    SAO 210116        SAO 187024        K    N        all-sky photometry, MOON, limit= 6.6m
PNV J18365700-2855420    2457099.23611    2015 Mar 17.7361    5.77    0.1    CV    SAO 210116        SAO 187024        K    N        all-sky photometry, limit= 6.9m
PNV J18365700-2855420    2457098.85069    2015 Mar 17.3507    6.35    0.1    CV    SAO 210116        SAO 187024        K    N        all-sky photometry, MOON, STARRY SKY, limit= 6.5m
PNV J18365700-2855420    2457098.87847    2015 Mar 17.3785    6.3    0.1    CV    SAO 210116        SAO 187024        K    N        all-sky photometry, MOON!, ZIRRUS!!!, STARRY SKY, limit= 6.6m
PNV J18365700-2855420    2457098.27431    2015 Mar 16.7743    5.6    0.12    CV    SAO 210116        SAO 187024        K    N        all-sky photometry, MOON!!!!, ZIRRUS !!!, STARRY SKY, limit= 6.8m
PNV J18365700-2855420    2457097.83472    2015 Mar 16.3347    5.9    0.12    CV    SAO 210116        SAO 187024        K    N        all-sky photometry, MOON!!!!, STARRY SKY, limit= 6.7m
PNV J18365700-2855420    2457097.23611    2015 Mar 15.7361    6.4    0.2    CV    SAO 187024                K    N        all-sky photometry, MOON!!!!, STARRY SKY, limit= 6.6m
PNV J18365700-2855420    2457096.84375    2015 Mar 15.3438    6.0    0.2    CV    SAO 186838                K    N        NOVA - OK!, all-sky photometry, MOON!!!!, STARRY SKY, limit= 6.2m
PNV J18365700-2855420    2457094.87500    2015 Mar 13.3750    <4.7        CV    SAO 186328                K    N        all-sky photometry, MOON!!!!, STARRY SKY, limit= 4.7m

Ivan Bryukhanov
BISA

reply delete ....

Ken4optics
I see there is photometric

I see there is photometric data being collected on this nova, but no spectra???

Surely there must be some members actively using the gratings??

 

mgw
mgw's picture
SA-200 data

Attached is my SA-200 data.  Unfortunately my configuration only allows 21 A/pixel resolution..

Gordon

Ivan Bryukhanov
BISA

[quote=Ken4optics]

I see there is photometric data being collected on this nova, but no spectra???

Surely there must be some members actively using the gratings??

 

[/quote]

 

I can not in the theme of the series showed photometry? :-)

Ken4optics
Jim's recent ALPY spectrum

Jim's recent ALPY spectrum shows reasonable data for comparison.

https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/astronomical_spectroscopy/conversations/messages/11484

At your lower resolution, I think you are still registering the Fe "hump", and the obvious changes to the Ha and Hb regions. Obviously higher resolution would help, but a good spectrum nevertheless.

 

 

hambsch
hambsch's picture
SA200 observations of the nova

Hi,

I am taking daily images with the grating remotely from Chile.

Regards,

Josch

Ken4optics
Josch, That sounds very

Josch,

That sounds very interesting.

Do you have any results to share?

 

Robin Leadbeater
Nothing from BSM South or Berry ?

Surprised not to see anything from BSM South or BSM Berry yet. These small scopes will work better with the SA200 in a filter wheel than a larger scope on a bright target like this, giving higher resolution.

Robin 

PJOC
PJOC's picture
Low-R spectra

I've been posting my higher-R spectra over on the thread in the nova page recently.

Here are a set of my low-res (R= c.700) spectra of the nova to date.  They are taken with the 150 l/mm grating on my Spectra L200.  They are rectified (continuum removed).  The middle spectrum (22/3) corresponds with the light-curve maximum; almost all the emission lines have vanished with the exception of H alpha.

Prominent emission lines (with P Cyg profiles) emerging since maximum are the Balmer lines, the Fe II lines 4472-4635, 4923-5425, and 6147-6247, the NaI doublet at 5890-95 (a single line at this R), the OI lines at  6158, 6456, 7773 and 8446, and the CaII triplet 8498-8542-8662.  Prety much what you'd expect at this stage of a classical Fe nova.  

I still find these brightness oscillations around maximum very interesting, and keep looking for an explanation.  Steve SHore talked about X-Ray pulsing in his last update to Francois ...

Cheers

Jonathan 

hambsch
hambsch's picture
Spetrum from April 7/8

Hi,

has anyone observed the nova spectroscopically last night? The nova spectrum has changed drastically from two nights before observing with an SA200 remotely.

The Fe lines dropped strongly around 5200 A.

Two spectra are attached.

Josch

RZD
RZD's picture
nova Sgr 2015 no.2

A nice Star Analyser 200 spectrum of this nova from Madrid, (Spain)

made from 30x30-sec exposures with an ST-8XME and LX200 25cm

Unfortunately my configuration only allows 15.5 A/pixel resolution..

RSpec software.

The star magnitude was at V=10.72 +-0.05.

    DATE      MAG         +/-     

--------  ------------  ---------    

  20150720.989  10.72V    0.05

Regards

Diego Rodriguez

RZD
RZD's picture
Nova Sgr 2015b = V5668 Sgr

Nova Sgr 2015b = V5668 Sgr

I have taken a low-resolution (SA 200) spectrum of this nova

Strong [O III] profiles evident.

My configuration only allows 15 A/pixel resolution.

OBJECT    DATE          MAG        

------  ------------  -----

V5668 SGR 20150910.882   9.08V

regards

Diego Rodriguez

Ed Wiley_WEY
Ed Wiley_WEY's picture
Nova Sgr 2015 No 2

 Here is my first effort for this Nova. SA200, 200mm Schmidt-Newtonian, Atik 4000. 17 Sept 2015 03:54 UT from Kenton OK (Okie-Tex Star Party). 180 second integration. ISIS reduction. Polynomial fir RMS = 1.74, Resolution 43.2. I think I have most of the lines correct, but please give me feedback.

Ed

 

 

FJQ
FJQ's picture
Nova V5668 Sgr

I was able to get two clear nights on this before it set into the sun......shot from Mt. Pinos, Ca (2,500 meter elevation) with a 33 Cm reflector with a L-200 spectrometer attached using a ST-10XME as a detector.  Shot 3x120sec exposure at three different micrometer settings to get the full visual spectrum.  Object was hard to visually identify, but once the spectrum was seen, it was an obvious nova target....lots of emission lines!

http://www.astroimage.info/images/Nova%20V5668%20Sgr%20Spectrum-08Nov15a.jpg

I'll try to post this on the spectra section in AASVO as soon as I finish 09Nov15 data.

James

stellakafka
stellakafka's picture
great data

Hello all,

The spectra presented here are really great; they showcase the evolution of the nova. I wonder if we can collectively make a time-evolution study of the observed ejecta velocities!  I wonder how accurate wavelength calibrations are; what are you using to detemine your wavelength scale? Please note that, becasue of ejecta kinematics, emission lines from the star are not appropriate for wavelength calibrations here (especially as lines are asymmetric...

 

Best wishes - clear skies,

Stella.

PJOC
PJOC's picture
Hi Stella, For calibration I

Hi Stella,

For calibration I use a neon-argon-xenon lamp mounted at the objective lens of the telescope. I take a calibration frame at the beginning and end of the observing run that captures both the calibration lines and the target spectrum.  I aim for at least a third-order polynomial calibration from at least five lines: particularly right down the blue end, the calibration is not linear.  

It tends to be pretty accurate!

Cheers

Jonathan 

 

 

FJQ
FJQ's picture
great data

To:  Stella

RE:"...Please note that, becasue of ejecta kinematics, emission lines from the star are not appropriate for wavelength calibrations..."

Point taken!  I was using RSpec's nebula lines and the H-Alpha & H-Beta to get a calibration.  I'm going to re-calibrate them using only the telleric lines to see if I can get a more accurate line spectrum.  Unfortunately, my L-200 Littrow spectoscope did not come with a working Neon source, so I'm mostly using A(3-5)v stars as a calibration.  I have a good set of Vega shots I took right after the V5668 Sgr Nova series, however, because the Nova was so low compared to Vega, I'm relutant to use RSpec's 1-point calibration.  Here is a link to a .jpg file I made of the spectrum .fits file data:

http://www.astroimage.info/images/V5668%20Sgr-6x120s-12x2-8&9Nov15-FJQ.jpg

09Nov15's data had better seeing obviously.

James

stellakafka
stellakafka's picture
Hello James,   Thanks for

Hello James,

 

Thanks for sharing your spectra. Balmer lines seem bright and broad - nice work! I am wondering if there is a way to add an external HeNeAr source to your system for future calibration needs (something to think about). I am looking forward to seeing your 1-d spectrum with new calibrations. 

 

Best wishes - clear skies,

Stella.

FJQ
FJQ's picture
Recalibrated Spectrum V5668 Sgr

Here is my recalibrated spectrum based on 3 atmospheric telluric lines that I was able to detect: http://www.astroimage.info/images/V5668%20Sgr-micro1205slit6-3x120sec2x2-09Nov15rTELLURICprofile.jpg

Using the NaI, OI, & OH telluric lines at 5890A, 6300.3A, & 6863.95A respectively with Rspec, I was able to get a 1st order polynomial fit of 1.2432 rms and a 2nd order of 0.00 on the spots I assigned these line in the raw profile spectrum.  This yields a angstrom/pixel scale of 1.1418 and R=5747 @ the Ha value of 6563A.  I know I would have gotten more accurate results using the French ISIS software, but I have a couple of weeks to get all my data to be compliant, not to mention a fairly step learning curve!

Unfortunately, I'm only able to use telluric line to calibrate this spectra region and maybe the adjacent spectral region ending slightly leftwards (shorter wavelength) of the H-Beta line; I shot 3x120sec2x2 binned exposures per the three spectral region spanning 3800-6950A, but I can only see the tellurics on two of the sets.  Here is an extremely stretched version of the.Fit image file showing the identification of the telleric and stellar lines: http://www.astroimage.info/images/V5668%20Sgr-micro1205slit6-3x120sec2x2-09Nov15rTELLURIC.jpg

Identification of the OH and some other useful lines was made from this graphic from Christian Buil's website: http://www.astrosurf.com/buil/us/spe2/night_ir_sky.png

Hope to have my neon calibration lamp working before the next nova/supernova event!

James

stellakafka
stellakafka's picture
Those are great spectra James

Those are great spectra James - calibrations with telluric lines seem to have worked beautifully!

 

Best wishes - clear skies,

Stella

stellakafka
stellakafka's picture
Hello Jonathan,   Thank you

Hello Jonathan,

 

Thank you for your reply - sounds great! On with measuring velocities?

 

Best wishes - clear skies,

Stella.

PJOC
PJOC's picture
Yes indeed!  There are a few

Yes indeed!  There are a few amateur spectra of this nova knocking about, along with the good photometric coverage on AAVSO.  Surely there's a publication or two in those data?

Ken4optics
Replacement Spectra-L200 Neon

James,

I believe from Mark you have already arranged for a replacement neon.

Stella,

Many of us use external lamps as a reference source. The Neon and or RELCO lamps can be positioned in front of the objective and with care can give very good results.

For shorter wavelengths I use the FILLY lamp (now very difficult to source) which works very well.

The current Shelyak LhiresIII and the JTW Spectra-L200 spectrographs both provide either Neon or RELCO reference lamps built-in. A similar calibration module can also be fitted to the lo-res ALPY.

Ken

 

FJQ
FJQ's picture
Replacement Spectra-L200 Neon

To:  Ken,

RE:"The Neon and or RELCO lamps can be positioned in front of the objective and with care can give very good results."

I tried purchasing a RELCO lamp, but all vendors are in Europe and will not ship to the US only to the EU Union.  Hope to get the Neon calibration set for the L-200 from Mark before 2016.  The one I received was faulty.

James

Ken4optics
James, Just search on

James,

Just search on "fluorescent starters" - The RELCO is popular in Europe but a local Philips etc may give you  similar results.

http://www.ursusmajor.ch/downloads/sques-relco-sc480-calibration-lines-3.0.pdf

 

Tonisee
Telluric spectrum

Hello!

When I'm doing precision RV work, I'll often try to use night sky spectrum to either create wavelength scale OR measure correction coefficients for specific lines. Unfortunately it's not always possible to see nice night sky emission lines - different atmospheric conditions translate to different sky background spectrum.

In the attachment, there is an identified night sky spectrum around hydrogen alpha region. Those marked lines give good dispersion curve (grating with 1200 l/mm) with dispersion 0.47 A/pix and RMS of fit of third order polynomial is 0.012 A. I'm considering that excellent.

Those lines on attached graph are typically not blends and therefore could be more or less safe to use with higher resolution. I think that because your spectrograph provides (much?) smaller dispersion, those lines you have used could be OK too (their deviations are too small compared to your dispersion). Just be careful not to use severe blends!

Best wishes,
Tõnis

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