High Energy Network (HEN)

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Information on the observation and analysis of stars and other objects that are sources of x-rays and gamma rays.

30 163 By Bikeman 1 week 2 days ago

Kilonova Catcher Project by GRANDMA

Affiliation
American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO)
Bikeman Sat, 02/13/2021 - 22:59

I'd like to promote the Kilonova-Catcher citizen science project here. This seems to be perfect for collaboration with High Energy Network observers of the AAVSO.

 

If you haven't watched it already, the second part of this AAVSO webinar

https://youtu.be/WIDxZDA2ZvY "AAVSO Webinar, with Melanie Crowson and Dr. Sarah Antier"

is a perfect introduction into this subject. The second part where Dr Sarah Antier explains this starts at around 39min  into the webinar.

 

Welcome to the High Energy Network

Affiliation
American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO)
daveh Tue, 02/25/2020 - 17:48

Welcome to the AAVSO International High Energy Network Forum and the High Energy Network Observing Section. The AAVSO International High Energy Network is dedicated to the optical monitoring of high energy astrophysical phenomena in the universe. It is an expansion of the AAVSO International Gamma-Ray Burst Network which had great success in discovering and observing the optical afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs).

FITS images from a video stream

Affiliation
American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO)
SGEO Mon, 05/16/2022 - 18:58

If I am trying to capture photometry for a SuperNova event, one of my fears would be over exposing the images. That would be sad: to be on target for the event but then capturing nothing of value.

What if the DSLR was put into a video mode? Is there experience with video-to-fits? That way you could stack your fits images to any SNR you would like.

George

 

How to prepare for DSLR observations of the coming SN event

Affiliation
American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO)
SGEO Thu, 05/05/2022 - 14:43

In the presentations about SNEWS they talk about how amateurs can contribute with DSLR observations.

The advantages are:
-  It would be quick to setup
-  It's 3 color photometry automatically

But there are problems:
- the target might be very bright
- what if comp stars are not available?

I'd like to start a discussion about how to be prepared to do DSLR observations of a SN.

If the event is so bright that it can be done in daylight, how does one calibrate and establish comps?

George

 

This could be interesting: Public Lecture on Neutrino Astronomy, April 5, 2022 at 4:30 PM EDT (UTC-4)

Affiliation
American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO)
Bikeman Thu, 03/24/2022 - 22:02

If you don't already know the Space Telescope Public lecture series, this might be a good reason to explore it:

Topic: Neutrino Astronomy: A New Window into the Extreme Universe

 

Speaker: Marcos Santander, University of Alabama

Date: Tuesday, April 5, 2022 at 4:30 PM EDT (UTC-4)

Livestream: https://youtu.be/CDAolatU2HE

Information: http://www.stsci.edu/public-lectures

 

Cheers

HBE

 

Software Recommendation: ASTRO-Colibri

Affiliation
American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO)
Bikeman Thu, 03/24/2022 - 20:23

Astro-Colibri is an application that alerts astronomers in real-time about astronomical transients like GRBs and supernovae. It is very useful if you wnt to get into the habit of being prepared to observe Gamma-Ray-Outbursts, e.g. as targets of opportunity while your observatory is ready doing other tasks.

 

Astro-Colibri can be used as a web-application, or, perhaps more useful when you want to be alerted in real-time, as a smart phone app for iOS and Android devices.

Interested? Check out : https://astro-colibri.herokuapp.com/

SWIFT still not fully "repaired", good time to discover GRB afterglows from Earth

Affiliation
American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO)
Bikeman Sat, 02/26/2022 - 23:56

After suffering the loss of a reaction wheel, the SWIFT satellite was abe to partially resume it's science mission on Feb 17th, but it seems it is still not fully capable to swiftly (forgive me the pun) slew automatically to observe optical Gamma Ray Burst *afterglows*, this leaves an interesting opportunity for us terrestrial observers.