High Energy Network (HEN)

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Information on the observation and analysis of stars and other objects that are sources of x-rays and gamma rays.

17 113 By Bikeman 2 months 1 week ago

Kilonova Catcher Project by GRANDMA

Affiliation
American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO)
Bikeman Sat, 02/13/2021 - 22:59

I'd like to promote the Kilonova-Catcher citizen science project here. This seems to be perfect for collaboration with High Energy Network observers of the AAVSO.

 

If you haven't watched it already, the second part of this AAVSO webinar

https://youtu.be/WIDxZDA2ZvY "AAVSO Webinar, with Melanie Crowson and Dr. Sarah Antier"

is a perfect introduction into this subject. The second part where Dr Sarah Antier explains this starts at around 39min  into the webinar.

 

Welcome to the High Energy Network

Affiliation
American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO)
daveh Tue, 02/25/2020 - 17:48

Welcome to the AAVSO International High Energy Network Forum and the High Energy Network Observing Section. The AAVSO International High Energy Network is dedicated to the optical monitoring of high energy astrophysical phenomena in the universe. It is an expansion of the AAVSO International Gamma-Ray Burst Network which had great success in discovering and observing the optical afterglows of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs).

Notable ATELs : BL Lac and RS Oph

Affiliation
American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO)
Bikeman Thu, 08/12/2021 - 18:07

Hi all,

I should have posted this earlier...too many distractions.

Anyway, there were a few ATELs that are relevant for the High Energy Astronomy community:

 

BL Lac is peaking in the optical and showing activity in high energy EM:

https://www.astronomerstelegram.org/?read=14854  and all the other recent ATELs linked in the list on the right hand side of the ATEL page

 

GRB 210702A

Affiliation
American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO)
Filipp Romanov Sun, 07/04/2021 - 15:26

Hello all!

I observed optical afterglow of GRB 210702A on July 3, 2021, remotely at iTelescope T17. My measurements of magnitude: 18.6 i' +/- 0.4 and 19.0 r' +/- 0.5 about 14 hours after the trigger. More information: https://gcn.gsfc.nasa.gov/gcn3/30364.gcn3 (in the GCN circular #30364).

With best regards,

Filipp.

GRB 210610B

Affiliation
American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO)
Filipp Romanov Fri, 06/11/2021 - 00:25

Hello all!

I observed the optical afterglow of GRB 210610B with iTelescope T18. I described the results of my observations in the GCN circular 30181 https://gcn.gsfc.nasa.gov/gcn3/30181.gcn3 (with correction: https://gcn.gsfc.nasa.gov/gcn3/30184.gcn3).

It is quite possible to photograph it now, it will be approximately 18 magnitude.

With best regards, Filipp.

Webinar Reminder June 12th 2021: "Observing the Next Galactic Supernova : Will you be ready?"

Affiliation
American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO)
Bikeman Mon, 06/07/2021 - 13:15

Here is a short reminder for a webinar that should be very interesting for observers in the HEN section, well, actually all observers...you can still register for "Observing the Next Galactic Supernova : Will you be ready?"

An abstract of the webinar is available here: https://www.aavso.org/2021-webinars-abstracts#supernova, to register for the webinar click on the link next to the webinar schedule here: https://www.aavso.org/2021-webinars-april-june

Clear Skies

HBE

Exciting news from KilonovaCatcher/GRANDMA (and the Palomar ZTF survey)

Affiliation
American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO)
Bikeman Sun, 05/30/2021 - 20:26

The KilonovaCatcher project aims to enlist amateur astronomers side by side with the professionals of the GRANDMA collaboration, in the quest to detect the optical counterpart of the merger of two neutron stars, called a kilonova. If the merger event happens sufficiently close to our own galaxy, it can be detected with gravitational wave detectors, but the sky localization will be rather poor. So the GW detectors will only give us a region in the sky where we should look for the kilonova, not exact coordinates.

How long an exposure to detect a 19th mag star

Affiliation
American Association of Variable Star Observers (AAVSO)
SGEO Tue, 04/27/2021 - 21:32

Ann Zabludoff gave a talk in the July 2020 HEN webinar discussing the Hotshots project. ( https://azabludoff.wixsite.com/hotshots )

I'm trying to learn the ways of Transient Astronomy so I figured to signup. One of the questions they ask in the form is what is your exposure time for a mag 19 star.

Hmm. Good question.

Any suggestions on how to determine this? Is there a standard field with calibrated stars down to that level? What SNR would be it be necessary to achieve detection? 50? What level of stacking is appropriate?